Category Archives: Practice News

Vitamin D – The Sunshine Vitamin

Dear Patients,

With the change of seasons into Autumn, the team from Chatswood Medical Practice would like to share some information on Vitamin D to ensure you maintain your optimum health to live your best life.  

What is Vitamin D? 

Vitamin D is a nutrient you need for good health. It helps your body absorb calcium, one of the main building blocks for strong bones. Together with calcium, Vitamin D helps protect you from developing osteoporosis, a disease that thins and weakens the bones and makes them more likely to break. Your body needs Vitamin D for other functions too. Your muscles need it to move, and your nerves need it to carry messages between your brain and your body. Your immune system needs Vitamin D to fight off invading bacteria and viruses. 

Sources of Vitamin D 

Small amounts of the Vitamin D you need can be obtained through food (about 5 – 10 per cent).  

  • Vitamin D is added to many breakfast cereals and to some brands of orange juice, yogurt, margarine, and other food products. 
  • Fatty fish (like trout, salmon, tuna, and mackerel) and fish liver oils are among the best natural sources of Vitamin D. 
  • Beef liver, egg yolks, and cheese have small amounts of Vitamin D. 
  • Mushrooms provide a little Vitamin D. 
  • Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun (90%). Your body makes Vitamin D when your bare skin is exposed to the sun. Most people get at least some Vitamin D this way. However, clouds, pollution, old age, and having dark-coloured skin reduce the amount of Vitamin D your skin makes. Also, your skin does not make Vitamin D from sunlight through a window.  

What happens if I don’t have enough Vitamin D? 

Factors such as lockdown, working from home, decrease in exercise and outdoor activities have may lead to Vitamin D deficiency.  

Vitamin D deficiency does not always have obvious symptoms but without treatment there can be significant health effects. These can include bone and muscle pain and softening of the bones – such as rickets (in children) and osteomalacia (in adults) which can make bones easy to fracture or break. 

Which adult groups are at high risk of Vitamin D deficiency? 

  • Older or disabled people in low-level and high-level residential care, particularly those who are housebound, hospitalised community-dwelling geriatric patients. 
  • Dark-skinned people of either sex 
  • People with a disability or chronic disease (eg: multiple sclerosis) 
  • Fair-skinned people and those at risk of skin cancer and avoid sun exposure 
  • People working in an enclosed environment, such as office workers, factory or warehouse workers or night-shift workers.

Do I need a Vitamin D Test? 

Vitamin D deficiency is done through a simple blood test by measuring a form of Vitamin D in your blood named 25-hydroxynitamin D (25-OHD).  

You may need a Vitamin D test if: 

  • you are at risk of Vitamin D deficiency or
  • you have abnormal levels of calcium, phosphate or magnesium in your blood 
  • you have bone problems 
  • you have diseases that might result in, or be caused by, too much or too little Vitamin D  
  • you have problems with your parathyroid gland 

Please check with your doctor whether you need a Vitamin D test. 

Source: National Institutes of Health 
Source: Health Direct 
Source: The Medical Journal of Australia 

Best wishes,

The Team from Chatswood Medical Practice

Introducing Our New Doctors

Dear Patients,

The team from Victoria Avenue Medical Practice hopes you are staying safe and well, especially for those who are going back to the office or school.  

Welcoming New Doctors at Our Practice 

Please join us to welcome our new doctors in the clinic. We attached their bio and area of special interest. Please do not hesitate to contact us should you like to know more about them or book an appointment Here.  

Dr Aaron Tso

Background – Dr. Aaron Tso completed his medical degree at the University of Queensland after first completing a degree in Medical Science with Honours at the University of Sydney. He spent a few years working as a resident around South-East Queensland before deciding to come home to Sydney and pursue GP training. He is fluent in Cantonese and eager to continue improving his Mandarin. 
Special Interests –  Paediatrics, lifestyle/preventative medicine and mental health. 
Personal Interests – Enjoys playing with his infant son, board games, martial arts, motorcycles, and bushwalks. 
Availability – Monday & Thursday: 8am to 5:30pm

Dr Evan Cameron

Background – Previously trained in Biomedical Engineering, Dr. Evan Cameron completed a graduate medical degree at the University of Sydney in 2014. His resident years were spent in the Hornsby and Northern Beaches area. He then worked for 2 years in Emergency Medicine at Westmead, and 1 year in Addiction Medicine in the Westmead/Blacktown/Mt Druitt region. 
Special Interests – Addiction medicine and most aspects of medicine. 
Personal Interests – He continues to enjoy dabbling in engineering and computer science. 
Availability – Tuesday & Friday: 8am to 5:30pm; Saturday 8am to 12pm

Dr Ronald Yuen

Background – Dr Ronald Yuen graduated from the University of Tasmania in 2013. He completed his residency in Concord Hospital and has spent 6 years working in areas of surgery in the Northern Sydney and Central Coast regions. 
Special interest – Skin excisions and all areas of general practice 
Personal Interests – outside of medicine, he enjoys tennis and travelling. 
Availability – Wednesday & Friday: 8am to 5:30pm; Alternate Saturday: 8am to 12pm

Rapid Antigen Test (RAT) 

With the wide adoption of Rapid Antigen Tests (‘RAT’), following are some basic information about RAT from the NSW Health Department. 

What happens if I get a positive RAT result? 

If you get a positive RAT result and unsure of the next step, you may follow the guideline below. 

Test result Symptoms Exposure risk Next step 
  Known or unknown contact You are a confirmed case, follow the advice for people testing positive for COVID-19 
 Or  Known high risk or household contact You are a confirmed case, follow the advice for people testing positive for COVID-19 
  No known contact You may be a confirmed case. Take another rapid antigen test within 24 hours or have a PCR test 

What type of RAT should I use? 

The Therapeutic Goods Administration provides a full list of RAT kits approved in Australia and how to use each one correctly. Please refer to https://www.tga.gov.au/covid-19-rapid-antigen-self-tests-are-approved-australia 

How do I use a RAT kit? 

Each RAT differs slightly so please follow the instructions of the RAT you are using. NSW Health has provided a quick video on how to use a basic nasal test. Click Here to watch the video.  

Can I eat or drink before using a saliva sample RAT? 

The answer is, “No. NSW Health recommends you do not eat, drink or brush your teeth for at least 30 minutes before doing a saliva rapid antigen test. This will ensure a clean sample is taken.” 

For full information on RAT for Covid-19 from the NSW Health, please refer to: 

https://www.nsw.gov.au/covid-19/stay-safe/rapid-antigen-tests-for-covid-19

How do I register a positive RAT result? 

From 12 January 2022, people who test positive to a Covid-19 RAT at home must register with Service NSW. You do not need to register if you have had: 

  • A negative or invalid RAT result 
  • A positive PCR test in the 28 days before your positive RAT 

To understand your eligibility, what you need and how to register, please refer to: 

https://www.service.nsw.gov.au/transaction/register-positive-rapid-antigen-test-result

Booster Eligibility 

You are eligible for a booster vaccination if you: 

  • are fully vaccinated (have received 2 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine), 
  • are aged 16 and over, and 
  • have received your second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine at least 3 months ago. 

For further information please see the NSW Government website Here. 

Please take care and stay safe.   

Best wishes,   
The Team from Victoria Avenue Medical Practice 

Skin Cancer Services

Skin Cancer Services are available at our practice. Please book an appointment with our friendly receptionist specifying skin checks if you require any of the below services:

> Full Body Skin Check

> Skin Biopsy

> Skin Excisions

> General Skin Care

Measles Alert!!

Measles Alert!

The numbers of measles cases continue to increase in NSW.

What are the symptoms?

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness which begins with a cough, fever, sore red eyes and runny nose. After three to four days a non-itchy red spotty rash will occur on your face and neck before spreading to the rest of the body.

People who are experiencing signs and symptoms of measles should seek medical attention.

What should I do if I think I have measles?

Call ahead to the practice and ask to speak to the nurse. She will triage your symptoms and give you further instructions to limit exposure if you need to come to the doctor. You should not sit in the waiting room without letting anyone know.

How is it spread?

Measles is highly contagious and is spread in the air through coughing or sneezing by someone who is unwell with the disease.

People are at risk of measles if they are exposed to an infectious case and have never had measles or have not received two doses of measles containing vaccine. Two doses of measles containing vaccine provide lifelong protection against infection in 99% of people. Most people born before 1966 are assumed to be immune to measles.

Can I get measles vaccination?

  • If you are between 25 and 53 years of age, you may be eligible for a vaccine booster.
  • Children in Australia are vaccinated at 12 and 18 months years of age.
  • If you have upcoming overseas travel plans, you should talk to your doctor.

For more information, please make an appointment with your GP.